Connected Cars

AutoMobility LA 2017: Securing Our Autonomous Future (Day 1)

Dec 8, 2017

Part One of our four-part series recapping the summit’s four days of exhibits, announcements and interactivity 

The 2017 Los Angeles Auto Show kicked off on Friday, December 1st, promising some stellar exhibits, surprise announcements and an immersive motor vehicle experience for all who attend. The show is celebrating its 110th year and has expanded from just 99 cars in Morley’s Skating Rink in Ocean Park, Los Angeles, back in 1907 to taking over virtually every available space of the Los Angeles Convention Center in the city’s Downtown area. However, for those interested in learning even more about what’s coming in the future of cars and the automotive industry as a whole, there is a show before the show in the form of AutoMobility LA, four days of announcements, thought provoking conferences, and first looks at innovative cars.

AutoMobility LA sets the stage from Day 1

AutoMobility LA entered its second year as it took place from November 27 – 30. It was a mecca for those curious about the intersection of technology and cars as well as hoping for a peek at what auto companies have up their sleeves for the future. Over the course of four days, AutoMobility LA covered everything from concerns about cyberhacking in the connected car space to Porsche’s return to its roots and more while also acting as an intensive primer on where the industry is headed.

Secure Mobility jumpstarts discussion

AutoMobility LA 2017’s first day was kicked off by the day long Secure Mobility Summit. This informational conference focused on cyber-security for connected cars and, most specifically, driverless vehicles in general.

Presented by Suits & Spooks founder, Jeffrey Carr, in conjunction with Car and Driver and other sponsors, Secure Mobility included several featured speakers and highlighted five key takeaways:

1 — Get In Front of the Breach

Every car maker is aware that as automobiles become more sophisticated, these machines are more vulnerable to tech savvy interference. Waiting for something to happen rather than being getting in front of it will only lead to worse problems down the line.

2 — Willingness to Invest

Comprehensive security of a car’s technology is expensive. But as each and every speaker said, the cost of NOT doing anything far outweighs being proactive in staving off a cyber-attack before it happens.

3 — Share Information

Auto manufacturers need to trust their competitors with any information that will lead to keeping everyone safe in their cars. Holding back intel regarding hacking of a system or a discovery on how to stop an attack can lead to the entire industry being brought down.

4 — Assume your car is always connected

Any car produced after a certain year is connected to the web in some way. Hands free talking through your dashboard, an insurance fob plugged into your onboard diagnostics (OBD) port, and that cool infotainment system connect you to the outside world. Your vehicle’s ability to communicate with the internet of things (IOT) means a constantly open digital doorway. However, there’s good news.

5 — Vehicle cyber attacks are DIFFICULT

Some basic internal configurations are shared across all vehicles, true, but ultimately, all those things that define a model’s specific operating system as being different from another model are what also makes them difficult to crack inside. It means if you really want to break into a system to bring a vehicle down, you need to learn everything there is to know about that particular auto’s OS and determine its weaknesses. It’s not so easy to take a car offline, although while a presenter was talking, his cohort was able to hack a navigation system as a demonstration on how quickly and easily GPS’s can be compromised with the right information and tools. Individual cars are generally well-protected, and as they continue to innovate, so does their security. However, commercial fleets share the same OS across a broad range of vehicles, and concern is high on how to ensure thousands of trucks and vans aren’t attacked all at once.

Shared cyber-security responsibility

Most of the ownness on protecting connected cars is on the auto industry, but as consumers of motor vehicles, there must be something we can do. When Sanchi Jayarami, Chief of Investment and Engagement at the National Security Division (NSD) — part of the Department of Justice (DOJ) — was asked what vehicle owners can do to secure their automobiles, she pointed to the risks and concerns discussed and said, “My parents said, ‘This is why we don’t use an ATM and we go into the bank to talk to a person.’ They’re not wrong. It’s important people read about what their car can do. How it works.”

Sanchi added, “I know it’s hard because of all the small print, but they’ve got to do it so they know how their information is being used and how they can protect it. And it’s important for companies to educate their consumers.”

As the first day came to an end, it was clear that the brilliance of the driverless cars and connected vehicles in general is as much a benefit as it is a concern. Both automakers and consumers need to be ready for what the future holds with more innovation, higher level technology, the reach of artificial intelligence (AI) in motor vehicles and the new players coming into the space. Each needs to be responsible for protecting and knowing their vehicles in order to be ready to do whatever is necessary to keep themselves and those they encounter on the road safe.

, , , , , , , , , , ,