V2Gov.com brings together automotive industry authorities, thought leaders, contributors and regular, everyday drivers to discuss the ever-changing world of transportation. Read more

Recent posts

Transportation Bill Paves the Way Toward Digital Vehicle Transactions

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Billed as a down payment for building a 21st century transportation system, the recently passed Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act, or Fast Act, contains a provision that clears a key hurdle in the industry’s drive toward a fully digital transaction. Inside the 1,300-page bill President Obama signed into law on Dec. 4 is language that allows states to begin digitizing odometer disclosures, notices and related materials. The language’s inclusion also means states will no longer have to apply to begin accepting electronic signatures on odometer disclosures — a cumbersome process that took years to complete and often didn’t result in approvals.

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How Advanced Safety Tech Is Impacting Driver Negligence and the Transportation Industry

Until truly autonomous vehicles hit the road in droves, advanced safety technologies in new cars are leading the way to neutralize driver negligence when it comes to split-second decisions in braking, lane changing and even inclement weather conditions. But do these systems really work at preventing accidents and saving lives? Advances in radar technology are helping to make self-driving cars a reality. Electronics manufacturers such as Delphi have created multiple sensors so radar is able to perform well in almost all driving conditions. Delphi, in fact, became the first company to pilot a self-driving car from coast to coast.

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V2Gov Is Not New, You Just Didn’t Know About It

As smart cars continue to evolve, so too will the infrastructures that will soon be able to directly communicate with these cars. Via vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication, every new car on the road will be wirelessly talking with every other new car on the road. With capabilities including the ability to control steering for parking, engaging brakes, and even car diagnostics, V2V car controls will oversee everything from traffic management to stopping a vehicle from entering a dangerous intersection. While all this might seem a little creepy, as vehicle-to-vehicle communication becomes more widespread, vehicle-to-government (V2Gov) communication will evolve into a common and extremely useful tool. Enabled by connected vehicle technology and eGovernment (eGov) strategies, the objective of V2Gov is to reassess, optimize and automate the delivery of vehicle-related public services to businesses and drivers. Technology, particularly the internet, has enabled greater interaction between public agencies and citizens, making vehicle-related transactions more time- and cost-efficient and convenient.

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Imagining Our Automotive Future at the Connected Car Expo

Mayor Eric Garcetti pledged to make Los Angeles a center for connected car technology and innovation. If you can’t live without your smartphone, you definitely won’t be able to live without a “smartphone on wheels.” That’s how visionaries at the Connected Car Expo (CCE) in Los Angeles in November described the automated, connected cars they predict will be hitting American roads in the coming years. Mayor Eric Garcetti opened the expo by pledging to make Los Angeles a hub for connected cars and new vehicle technology, indicating that the city’s doors are open to entrepreneurs. According to the entrepreneurs who presented, including representatives of Lyft, Volkswagen, Google, the Los Angeles Taxi Commission and startups like HopSkipDrive, the future of personal automobiles and transportation lies in autonomous vehicles, ensuring safety, neutralizing cybersecurity concerns and ride sharing. Autonomous Vehicles The future will be about rethinking how we view driving and vehicles, and the amount of time we spend on activities related to them.

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eOdometer Disclosure Law Could Make Paperless Auto Sales Real

State and federal laws long ago cleared the way for the use of electronic records and electronic signatures in most areas of commerce. But auto dealers, for the most part, still conduct sales using paper documents. That could soon change with the passage of the next federal highway bill, which contains language that paves the way for electronic odometer disclosures. It’s been a long journey, but this critical change could ultimately pave the way for completely paperless auto sales. When Congress passed the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act (ESIGN) in 2000, it opened the eCommerce floodgates.

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What Is E-Gov? Streamlining Government Process

Remember standing in endless lines to get your driver’s license renewed? Or the hassle of filing any important personal or business documents. Dealing with any government agency in the past was enough to send anyone straight over the edge. Well welcome to the brave new world of e-gov and the numerous benefits it offers. E-government, or e-gov, is the use of information technology to support government operations, engage citizens, and provide government services.

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Ending Gridlock Paves the Road for Connected Vehicles

We’re on the brink of a connected-vehicle revolution. With the proper investments today, we could be right around the corner from a tomorrow in which connected vehicles (CVs) and a network of smart roads and highways bring us a safer, smarter, greener and more economically-productive surface transportation system. CVs are wirelessly connected to the Internet and to other smart devices — such as your phone or tablet — inside and near the vehicle. Together the vehicle works with those devices and networks to connect the driver and passengers to services and devices outside the car such as other cars, homes, offices or infrastructure. For CVs to reach their potential we need to start upgrading our traditional public roads and highways to intelligent transportation systems (ITS).

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“Talking” to Connected Cars: The Future of Transportation and V2X/V2V Technology

How “connected cars” are transforming the way we drive and “talk” to other cars, dealers, manufacturers and government agencies.  By Don Armstrong, CEO, Motor Vehicle Software Inc. (MVSC) The term “connected car” seems to be all over the news these days. From CO2 reductions via zero emissions vehicles to a no-accident future with self-driving cars to cybersecurity for preventing “car hackers,” the ever-growing connected car world is literally going warp speed ahead. In fact, driving what is now a virtual “computers on wheels” is changing how we get around right now and in the future for consumers, dealers, manufacturers and even government agencies. As a pioneer in motor vehicle software technology, I wasn’t surprised at the findings in a recent report by Navigant Research titled Connected Cars: Vehicle-to-X Communications and Supporting Technologies: Global Market Analysis and Forecasts.

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Connected Cars and the New Business Economy

Connected cars are not just changing the way we drive cars, but in-car tech, mobile GPS and new auto-specific mobile apps are already having a big impact on how companies and entire industries do business. In fact, the increasingly connected and fast- evolving transportation and human activity landscape is giving birth to new ways of living and doing business especially when it comes to entertainment, insurance, government interfacing and aftermarket applications. Let’s start with the insurance industry. Did you know on-board telematics are just starting to transform insurance companies? More and more, consumers are allowing their insurance company to track their vehicle via GPS-delivered data to monitor driving patterns, gather data and then spit out evaluations to save on monthly bills or advise drivers on how best to decrease their insurance costs.

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Drive Like It’s 2025: Connected Cars Are the Norm and Your Commute is Unrecognizable

Connected Car (definition) — the presence of devices in an automobile that connect the devices to other devices within the car/vehicles and or devices, networks and services outside the car including other cars, home, office or infrastructure. It is 2025, and connected cars have been the norm for the past five years. Before being connected, I would get in my car and instantly get disconnected from the world. Today, my car alerts me and service personnel to vehicle issues, allowing appointments to be made in less time and with more information about what’s wrong with the vehicle. In addition, software fixes that might have been performed at a dealership now are initiated through the Internet.

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