Car Hacking: Safeguarding Your Connected Car

Computer viruses are nothing new. The brutal lessons learned from those who’ve survived them make us more cautious when surfing the digital wave on our devices. But how often do we think of our vehicles as motorized computers? Today’s automobiles include operating systems that provide climate control, fuel efficiency, satellite-based entertainment, automated safety features and more. Basically, we’re driving smartphones on wheels, something we tend to forget.

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Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC): A Path Toward Greater Road Efficiency

In 1945, a blind engineer named Ralph Teetor invented cruise control, the popular automobile feature that most modern citizens can’t live without. Since that time, cruise control systems and their technology have evolved into even “smarter” technologies called adaptive cruise control (ACC). ACC employs radar sensor technology to automatically adjust a vehicle’s speed based on its surroundings. In support of collision avoidance, a car with ACC automatically slows down if it senses that the car in front of it is too close. Patented by General Motors in 1991, this technology, which was once reserved for luxury vehicles alone, is far more common, having been embraced by the likes of Honda, Subaru and Kia Motors.

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Challenges Loom for Connected Cars – But None Are Insurmountable

What could slow down the rise of connected cars?  It’s not just the pace of technological innovation.  Lawmakers, dealers, consumers, developers – all will play major roles in the mass adoption of new technologies and rise of a truly smart IoT (Internet of Things).  So what are the 10 greatest hurdles to mass adoption of V2V?  Take a look at what Forbes has to say.

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V2Gov Is Not New, You Just Didn’t Know About It

As smart cars continue to evolve, so too will the infrastructures that will soon be able to directly communicate with these cars. Via vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication, every new car on the road will be wirelessly talking with every other new car on the road. With capabilities including the ability to control steering for parking, engaging brakes, and even car diagnostics, V2V car controls will oversee everything from traffic management to stopping a vehicle from entering a dangerous intersection. While all this might seem a little creepy, as vehicle-to-vehicle communication becomes more widespread, vehicle-to-government (V2Gov) communication will evolve into a common and extremely useful tool. Enabled by connected vehicle technology and eGovernment (eGov) strategies, the objective of V2Gov is to reassess, optimize and automate the delivery of vehicle-related public services to businesses and drivers. Technology, particularly the internet, has enabled greater interaction between public agencies and citizens, making vehicle-related transactions more time- and cost-efficient and convenient.

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“Talking” to Connected Cars: The Future of Transportation and V2X/V2V Technology

How “connected cars” are transforming the way we drive and “talk” to other cars, dealers, manufacturers and government agencies.  By Don Armstrong, CEO, Motor Vehicle Software Inc. (MVSC) The term “connected car” seems to be all over the news these days. From CO2 reductions via zero emissions vehicles to a no-accident future with self-driving cars to cybersecurity for preventing “car hackers,” the ever-growing connected car world is literally going warp speed ahead. In fact, driving what is now a virtual “computers on wheels” is changing how we get around right now and in the future for consumers, dealers, manufacturers and even government agencies. As a pioneer in motor vehicle software technology, I wasn’t surprised at the findings in a recent report by Navigant Research titled Connected Cars: Vehicle-to-X Communications and Supporting Technologies: Global Market Analysis and Forecasts.

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Drive Like It’s 2025: Connected Cars Are the Norm and Your Commute is Unrecognizable

Connected Car (definition) — the presence of devices in an automobile that connect the devices to other devices within the car/vehicles and or devices, networks and services outside the car including other cars, home, office or infrastructure. It is 2025, and connected cars have been the norm for the past five years. Before being connected, I would get in my car and instantly get disconnected from the world. Today, my car alerts me and service personnel to vehicle issues, allowing appointments to be made in less time and with more information about what’s wrong with the vehicle. In addition, software fixes that might have been performed at a dealership now are initiated through the Internet.

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